Acupuncture, Prism Blog

Why I Love Acupuncture, and You Should Too

Prior to being an acupuncturist, my background was in health education. I had also worked as a personal care assistant and receptionist at a chiropractic clinic. All of these experiences taught me that I wanted to be able to work with patients, and I wanted to have the tools to help them right then and there. I didn’t like western medicine, which tends to see the doctor as all knowing and doesn’t take into account patients experiences of their bodies and needs. Also, though I do a lot of health education in my acupuncture work now, I didn’t like just educating people, without being able to actually do anything for them. I wanted it to be a two-way street. I wanted to be able to provide them with care that would help them right away AND involve them in their own healing process. This led me to explore various alternative medicine fields.

I came to acupuncture specifically through a love of herbal medicine, sparked by my botanist father who taught me a deep appreciation for plants, and the women in my family who taught me the value of caring for others.

I had only had acupuncture once, on a whim, before starting acupuncture school and I didn’t really know if I’d like it. I’m sure some of you can relate!

I decided that if I didn’t like it, I’d just study the herbs and skip the rest of the program. It turns out I LOVE acupuncture and being an acupuncturist and I’m so glad I started this journey.

My favorite part of my job is watching people regain ownership of their healing process, reconnect with their bodies, and make positive changes in their lives.

Acupuncture is a holistic system that brings you back into balance by fixing the root of a problem rather than just the symptoms.

Some acupoints trigger a release of calming hormones, some rewrite pain pathways, some awaken the immune system, have anti-inflammatory effects, or increase circulation. Together, they help our nervous systems switch from ‘fight or flight’ (stress) mode into ‘rest and digest’ (healing) mode. This helps us keep calm, sleep well, build our immune systems, and repair cellular damage.

Most importantly, acupuncture helps people reconnect with their bodies and take true ownership of their healing processes.

Acupuncture makes small adjustments in your body to set you on the right path for healing. It’s your choice to continue to follow that path in between your treatments. Your body wants to heal. It likes getting a little reset so it can get back to doing what it does best. Acupuncture allows you to set your healing intentions and send you in the right direction to actually accomplish them. What a wonderful gift.

The more scientifically identifiable effects of an acupuncture treatment (including changes in nerve and pain pathways, as well as endorphins and other brain chemicals that are released) last about four days after a session. Notice how you feel over the first 3-4 days after your treatment, jotting down any improvements or symptoms that you notice, like increased energy, better sleep, better digestion, and improvement in whatever symptoms you came in for. This allows you to keep in touch with your body and understand what it needs, and also helps us understand how you’re responding to treatment.

When you listen to your body, follow the healing path that acupuncture lays out for you, and come in often, this truly allows the healing momentum to build up. Rather than bouncing back and forth between better after acupuncture and worse again between each session, you begin to improve and improve and improve. Each time you come in, you’re expanding upon what you’ve already accomplished and you can actually start to see dramatic changes in your mental, physical, and spiritual health. Even once you’re feeling great it’s important to come in for your monthly or seasonal ‘tune-up’, just to keep your body on the right track of healing so that you can continue to enjoy good health.

It can be really challenging to create new habits and let go of old patterns that don’t serve us. It is so much easier just to come in and expect your healthcare provider to fix you. And sometimes we can do exactly that. But mostly those kind of fixes are temporary; the lasting changes come with work that you do outside of our sessions as well. Acupuncture can help you get there by resetting your nervous system and helping you reconnect to what your body has been telling you all along.

What do you do to get the most out of your acupuncture sessions? Why do you love acupuncture?


Schedule your first acupuncture session now, at www.prismacupuncture.com/appointments


This information is for educational purposes only, please consult a healthcare provider before exercising and always follow your surgeon’s advice.

Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Scar Reduction, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Can You Exercise After Gender Affirming Surgeries?

Exercise can be a great way to increase energy, keep your body strong, and help clear your mind. Treating your body kindly with modified exercise before and after surgery is especially imperative to assist in the healing process. However, it’s important to know how much and what type is okay. Today, we’re breaking down what types of exercise you can incorporate into your recovery routine and how they can help your body feel its best after gender affirming surgery.

Remember that this is just a guide. Only YOU know your body and your limits. While there may be movements that are uncomfortable after surgery, never do anything that causes you pain or causes you to bleed. Know your body’s limits and be sure to take care of it.

Pre-Op:

Prior to your surgery, it’s best to make time for daily exercise. While each person is unique, take time to discover what exercises feel good and prepare your body best for surgery. Since you likely won’t be able to be active for some time after surgery, it’s important to get your exercise in and make it count.

  1. Foam rolling: You can buy these in most stores or online and they can be used to help sore or tight muscles. Use a foam roller daily the week before surgery (or earlier than that) to soothe any tight muscles. Do what feels right for your body, but refer to this article for five beginner-friendly positions. 
  2. Core exercises: Core work can help your posture and strengthen your core. Here are some core moves to incorporate into your exercises before your surgery. 
  3. Stretching: Stretching isn’t just for before or after a workout. Stretching can help with tight muscles, improve flexibility, release tension, and more. Find a stretching routine that works for you
  4. Pelvic floor exercises: Prior to bottom surgery–like vaginoplasty, metoidioplasty, or phalloplasty–pelvic floor exercises can be extremely helpful in preparing the body. One exercise we recommend involves imagining you’re picking up a marble or closing a drawstring purse with your perineum. Pick it up, hold for a moment, then let it go. This exercise can both strengthen and relax your pelvic floor muscles prior to surgery. If you have any pre-existing pain or issues with urination, contact a pelvic physical therapist to discuss what’s best for your body. 

Post-Op:

After your surgery, you may notice your body feels and moves differently. It’s important to be sure to balance out your healing with both rest and movement to help your body in its recovery. Take each move slowly, paying attention to how your body is feeling.

  1. Slow walks: Unless you’re on bed rest (which may be the case for bottom surgery), try going for a slow walk around the block the day after surgery. If you’re on bed rest, start this the day you’re off bed rest. Bring a buddy with you to keep you company and assist you if needed. Rather than going for longer walks, go for shorter walks more often. A good rule of thumb is to aim for three one-block walks every day in the first week, then increase to a few blocks at a time if you’re up to it. Many doctors recommend you keep your walks short, around less than 15 minutes until two or more weeks post-op. 
  2. Ankle exercises: Start with pointing and flexing your toes 20 times every two hours. Then, make circles with your ankles 10 times in each direction to promote circulation and prevent deep vein thrombosis. This is recommended to be done every two hours while lying in bed. Ankle pumps are simply moving your ankle up and down. To do ankle pumps, plantarflex one foot as if pressing down on an imaginary gas pedal. Then, dorsiflex your feet by pulling your toes up toward your shins as if letting off the gas. Repeat with the other foot and alternate sides for 20 repetitions. This is great when you’re on bed rest, such as after phalloplasty, metoidioplasty, or vaginoplasty.
  3. Deep breathing: Not necessarily an exercise, but a great way to check in with yourself and your body. If at any point you need to relax, breathe through discomfort, or put your mind at ease, practice deep breathing through your nose. Let your belly and chest expand all the way from the tops of your shoulders to your pelvic floor, and sideways to expand your ribs. Feel the air fill your lungs and exhale slowly through the mouth. Do this however often you’d like, with a recommendation of two or more minutes, two or more times per day. Yes, this exercise is ok to do after top surgery (mastectomy, chest masculinization, or breast augmentation); you may feel some discomfort but should not feel pain.
  4. Shoulder rolls: With a surgeon’s consent, stand or sit comfortably with your arms relaxed at your sides. In a circular motion, bring your shoulders forward, up, backward, and down. Try to make the circle as large as you can and move both of your shoulders at the same time, doing this 10 times. If you have tightness across your incision or chest, start with smaller circles and increase the size as the tightness decreases. After your series of 10, switch directions and do 10 shoulder rolls in the backward direction. Bring your shoulders backward, up, forward, and down. You may find that the backward direction is a little tighter across your chest than the forward direction. Rest assured knowing that this will get better with practice.
  5. “Chicken wings:” Also called shoulder wings, these are done by placing your hands on your chest or collarbone, wherever is most comfortable. Raise your elbows upwards out to the side, limiting your range of motion as instructed by your healthcare team. Slowly lower your elbows. Do this 10 times, imitating a chicken wing, and then slowly lower your hands back down to your lap. If you feel discomfort while doing this exercise, hold your position and do the deep breathing exercise above. If the discomfort doesn’t go away, don’t raise your elbows any higher. If the discomfort does go away, finish the exercise in a range of motion that’s comfortable for you.
  6. Arm side circles: With a surgeon’s consent, stand with your feet slightly apart to help you balance. Raise each arm, one at a time, out to the side as high as you can. Gently, start making slow, backward circles in the air with your arm. Be sure you’re moving your arm from your shoulder, not your elbow, and keep your elbow straight. Increase the size of the circles until they’re as large as you can comfortably make them, limiting your range of motion as instructed by your healthcare team. Be sure to complete at least 10 full backward circles. If you feel any aching or if your arm is tired, take a break. Continue doing the exercise when you feel better. Slowly lower your arm to your side to rest your arm for a moment. Repeat the exercise at your comfort level, this time making slow, forward circles instead. 
  7. Hand pumps: These can help reduce swelling in the chest and should be done three times a day. Open and close the fists ten times, holding for a few moments in between. 
  8. Other exercises: Three slightly more advanced poses to help with surgical recovery are “happy baby pose,” “child’s pose,” and side bends. You can use a pillow under your knees in child’s pose if it’s uncomfortable. Wait to start these until you have surgeon approval as they require a little more range of motion. 

Remember: If you can’t eat, drink, and/or urinate, or have a fever, chills, an infection, trouble breathing, unusual bleeding, redness, feel unwell, or have a hot feeling in the surgical site, call your doctor or go to the emergency room. Ask your surgeon what signs you should look for regarding post-surgical complications.

Get acupuncture home visits in Berkeley, Oakland, and the greater Bay Area to improve your recovery: www.prismacupuncture.com/appointments

This information is for educational purposes only, please consult a healthcare provider before exercising and always follow your surgeon’s advice.

How LGBT Inclusion Can Grow Your Acupuncture Practice
Acupuncture, For Providers, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Free Webinar for Practitioners!

Did you miss last weekend’s free Gender 101 webinar for practitioners?

You can still catch the replay!

I am so honored to have participated in Lhasa OMS, CSOMA, and Smarty Practice’s ‘Love Your Practice’ digital summit last weekend, where I led a 1-hour training on ‘How LGBT-Inclusion Can Grow Your Patient Base.’ We reached 900 people!

Check out the replay online.

Creating an LGBT-Inclusive Practice Can Grow Your Patient Base

Katrina Hanson, L.Ac. – Prism Integrative Acupuncture

Click here.

Want to learn more?

Check out my upcoming 4-credit CEU class (CA pending): The LGBT-Inclusion Toolkit, Upgrade Your Acupuncture Practice.

Find out more: https://prismintegrativeacupuncture.com/lgbt-inclusion-webinar/

a rainbow, symbolizing Prism Integrative Acupuncture's commitment to LGBT health
Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Chinese Medicine, Natural Transition, and the Gender Binary

Chinese Medicine, Natural Transition, and the Gender Binary. A guest post on Tynan Rhea’s website (founder of postpartumsex.com).

A few excerpts:

Yin and yang are often associated with female and male energy respectively, which leads to the misconception that Chinese Medicine is inherently binary and therefore inappropriate for trans medicine. It is true that most diagnoses in Chinese medicine refer to the interaction between opposites: hot and cold, internal and external, excess and deficient, yin and yang, among others. However, yin and yang, though often associated with male and female energy, are more accurately represented by masculine and feminine.

The great thing about Chinese Medicine is that we always work from a constitutional root. We look at the person’s tongue and feel their pulse to identify the root of a person’s pattern and work on that as well as the symptoms. The goal is always to bring the patient into alignment with their constitution, not to change them based on societal expectations of their sex and what their hormone profile will look like.

I see many trans men pre-testosterone present as yang (testosterone) deficient and many trans women pre-estrogen present as yin (estrogen/progesterone) deficient. Treatment in this case affirms their identity and assists their transition. Once folks have been on hormones for a while, sometimes testosterone depletes yin and spironolactone (a testosterone-blocker) depletes yang. In this case, it is appropriate to tonify the depleted energy to bring the person back into balance. This does not in any way counteract their transition, it gently balances and keeps them healthy and aligned with their constitutions. Similarly, an intersex person with yin deficiency would be treated differently than an intersex person with yang deficiency, regardless of their chromosomes or type of intersex diagnosis.

Read more


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

 

Katrina Hanson LAc of Prism Integrative Acupuncture, a lesbian queer acupuncturist in Oakland, Bay Area, California
Acupuncture, Press, Prism Blog

Spotlight with BCA Clinic

July Practitioner Spotlight with Katrina Hanson

My favorite part of my job is watching people regain ownership of their healing process, reconnect with their bodies, and make positive changes in their lives.

I came to acupuncture through a love of herbal medicine, sparked by my botanist father who taught me a deep appreciation for plants. On road trips growing up, he’d suddenly pull over to the side of the road, jump out of the car, and sprint up a hill to a tiny rare flower that he somehow spotted while driving… Click to keep reading!


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

video screenshot of Katrina Hanson LAc talking about how acupuncture can help the LGBTQ community
Acupuncture, For Providers, Press, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Acupuncture and Trans Medicine

Just a little throwback to this video about my gender-inclusivity activism at my alma mater, the Acupuncture and Integrative Medicine College (AIMC) Berkeley. It’s so wonderful to reflect on how much my practice and my knowledge has evolved; all with the support of my wonderful patients. This has been a long process and I’m looking forward to continuing the journey with all of you!


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

four queer and trans teenagers
Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Herbs as Transition Alternative for Trans Kids and Teens

Growing up is always eventful and often tumultuous. For trans and gender non-conforming kids and teens, the stress and chaos can be magnified. Many studies have shown the importance of allowing trans kids to express their identities; it greatly reduces their suicide risk and imroves their lifetime mental and physical health. However, it can be difficult for parents to know how to approach this, especially when so many effects of prescription hormones are irreversible. Prism Integrative Acupuncture provides a safe, supportive space for kids and teens to explore their identies and start the process of transitioning in a mild and natural way, while allowing parents time to adjust to these changes. For gender non-conforming or gender variant kids who may not want to transition, this can be an especially important method of exploration. Whether your child is taking hormone blockers, HRT, or nothing at all, acupuncture and herbs can help them feel more comfortable in their bodies and identities while reducing their overall risks and long-term effects. We happily work with MDs, therapists, and other types of healthcare providers to give your child the most well-rounded care possible.

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Acupuncture and herbs may help to:

  • Connect gender creative/non-conforming kids with their bodies to reduce dysphoria
  • Create space to explore identity and gender expression without judgement or irreversible treatments
  • Reduce anxiety surrounding the menstrual cycle
  • Slow a heavy flow, ease cramps, reduce PMS and bloating
  • Prevent spotting between cycles, which can be a side effect of prescription progesterone or testosterone
  • Calm and reduce anxiety and depression, to help improve school attendance rates
  • Together with prescription progesterone, herbs may suppress the menses
  • “Test out” slight hormonal shifts without taking prescription hormones
    • Feminizing herbs may support slight breast growth
    • Masculinizing herbs may support some facial hair growth
    • Herbs can create a “feeling” of hormonal change in the body, which for some people is enough to reduce dysphoria
  • Smooth side effects of prescription hormones or hormone blockers
  • Reduce compression pain, back pain, chest tightness, and skin lesions from binding and gaffing
  • Reduce Acne
  • Reduce fatigue
  • Improve sleep
  • Benefit focus and concentration
  • Reduce stress and soothe anxiety
  • Lift depression
  • Boost your immune system to keep you healthy through the seasons

    All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


    Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

    Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

a queer dad and his baby
Acupuncture, Endometriosis, Fertility and Pregnancy, PCOS, Prism Blog, Sex & Relationships, Transgender Wellness

Acupuncture and Herbs for Reproductive Health and Fertility

Western treatments for reproductive health can often be frustrating and come with a lot of side effects. Acupuncture and herbs provide support to these western treatments to reduce side effects and improve success, as well as an alternative to more invasive western treatments. We happily work with MDs, fertility specialists, and other types of providers to provide you with the most well-rounded care possible.

Acupuncture and herbs may help to:

  • Restart the menses in amenorrhea
  • Slow a heavy flow
  • Ease cramps
  • Reduce PMS/PMDD and bloating
  • Prevent spotting between cycles
  • Inspire a more regular cycle
  • Regulate hormones and ease symptoms of PCOS
  • Ease symptoms of endometriosis and fibroids
  • Ease symptoms of fibrocystic breasts
  • Soothe vaginal dryness
  • Reduce pain with sex and increase orgasmic capacity
  • Improve prostate health and reduce swelling and inflammation
  • Increase erectile capacity
  • Improve ovulation frequency
  • Assist with restarting the menstrual cycle and promoting fertility after stopping testosterone
  • Assist with regulating hormones and improving fertility by soothing endocrine and autoimmune disorders, such as Hashimotos
  • Reduce some types of miscarriage risk
  • Ease morning sickness, edema, fatigue, and other symptoms of pregnancy
  • Reduce rates of some presentations of malpositioned fetuses
  • Prepare the body to start labor on time
  • Speed recover post labor or cesarean
  • Benefit lactation and reduce risk of mastitis
  • Soothe anxiety and post-partum depression to improve baby bonding

shutterstock_388058173.jpg


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

A transgender woman wearing a leopard print femme top
Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

The Three-Part Recipe for Natural Transitioning

What does natural transition mean?

In contrast to using prescription hormones and/or surgeries, natural transition usually involves some combination of social transition, presentation transition, herbs, acupuncture, and/or nutrition.

Herbs: Herbs are a desired alternative to HRT for many people who wish to experience only mild changes, rather than the more drastic effects of prescription hormones. Herbs alone may cause slight breast growth (feminizing herbs), or slight facial hair growth (masculinizing herbs). They can also be used to reduce hair loss, ease pain from binding and gaffing, and much more.
For most people, herbs aren’t going to change your hormones drastically alone, so someone might choose to start out taking synthetic hormones and, once they’ve achieved the effect they want, use herbs to lower their dose of synthetic hormones or switch to herbs entirely. Herbs can maintain the hormone levels and characteristics you’ve built up with synthetic hormones. This is a good alternative to the sometimes unpleasant side effects of long-term synthetic hormone use.
Herbs are also great at reducing side effects of prescriptions hormones, like hot flashes, acne, hair loss, vaginal dryness, blood pressure imbalance, edema and bloating, and many other effects.

Acupuncture: Acupuncture is most well known for its effects of reducing pain and speeding healing. It is in fact great for reducing chest tightness, back pain, and skin lesions from binding and gaffing, as well as reducing pain and swelling and speeding healing after surgeries. Acupuncture can also be used to reduce the appearance of scars, including keloid scars, improve circulation to reduce the chance of blood clots and edema, and regulate blood pressure. It also soothes anxiety and depression, improves sleep and digestion, and generally aids your overall well-being.

Nutrition: Foods alone won’t cause notable changes, no matter how strict of a diet you follow. However, certain foods do have the ability to change our hormone profiles, most notably those that are estrogenic. By increasing or decreasing estrogenic foods in your diet, as well as by eating a balanced diet aimed at encouraging detox and flushing out of other hormones, nutrition can be an important part of your transition plan.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

a trans man and a trans woman cuddling
Acupuncture, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

20+ Ways Acupuncture Supports Transgender Wellness

Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture have thousands of years of experience in dealing with hot flashes, low libido, erectile dysfunction, vaginal dryness, menstrual spotting, and hair loss, among other symptoms. Many of these treatments can be applied to transgender care, to complement hormone therapy during transition. Additionally, acupuncture has been shown to greatly reduce recovery time from surgery and help with post-surgical problems such as lack of sensation and scarring. Acupuncture and herbs can be used to stimulate hair regrowth, stop uterine spotting, and ease side effects of prescription hormones. We happily work with MDs, surgeons, and other healthcare providers to give you the most well-rounded care possible.

Acupuncture and herbs may help to:

  • Ease menstrual, uterine, post-hysterectomy, and ‘psychosomatic’ cramps
  • Reduce PMS/PMDD and cyclical bloating
  • Reduce spotting and breakthrough bleeding
  • Ease symptoms of endometriosis and fibroids
  • Soothe vaginal dryness and atrophy
  • Ease candida/yeast infections and bacterial vaginosis (BV)
  • Reduce pain with sex and increase orgasmic capacity
  • Improve fertility, and help restore fertility post-T
  • Improve prostate health and reduce swelling and inflammation
  • Increase erectile capacity
  • Balance hormones to soothe ups and downs
  • Speed effects of pharmaceutical hormones
  • Reduce hot flashes and night sweats
  • Reduce post-surgical pain, speed healing, and reduce scarring
  • Reduce compression pain, chest tightness, and skin lesions from binding and gaffing
  • Improve circulation to prevent blood clots
  • Reduce edema and water weight
  • Regulate low and high blood pressure
  • Reduce and restore hair loss
  • Reduce fatigue
  • Improve sleep
  • Benefit memory and concentration
  • Reduce stress and soothe anxiety
  • Lift depression
  • Boost your immune system to keep you healthy through the seasons

    All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


    Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

    Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

Acupuncture, Menopause and Beyond, Prism Blog, Sex & Relationships, Transgender Wellness

Menopause and Beyond

Menopause, ‘manopause’, and mid-life transitions can be beautiful, world-opening times in our lives when we discover new pieces of ourselves and become more at peace in our bodies. They can also sometimes be uncomfortable, tumultuous, and stressful. Just like hormonal fluctuations during puberty, shifting hormones during menopause are a major cause of this stress and discomfort. The goal of using acupuncture and herbs during this time is to reduce the symptoms of menopause and hormonal changes, regulate and balance your hormones for a smoother transition, and soothe anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues that can flare up during this time of great change. Whether you’re taking HRT (hormone replacement therapy) or not, acupuncture and herbs may help make your transition smoother and more enjoyable, and continue providing support long after these mid-life changes too. We happily work with MDs and other healthcare providers to give you the most well-rounded care possible.
Acupuncture and herbs may help to:
  • Balance hormones to soothe ups and downs
  • Reduce hot flashes and night sweats
  • Reduce breakthrough bleeding and regulate the menstrual cycle
  • Improve vaginal dryness
  • Improve erectile dysfunction
  • Smooth transition onto or off of HRT and hormone blockers (like tamoxifen or arimidex)
  • Reduce post-surgical pain, speed healing, and reduce scarring
  • Beyond menopause:
    • Improve circulation to reduce blood clots and heal leg sores
    • Reduce leg and ankle edema
    • Regulate low and high blood pressure
    • Reduce or reverse hair loss
  • Reduce fatigue
  • Improve sleep
  • Benefit memory and concentration
  • Reduce stress and soothe anxiety
  • Lift depression
  • Boost your immune system to keep you healthy through the seasons

shutterstock_442274029.jpg


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

 

A beautiful transgender woman
Acupuncture, For Providers, hair loss, Menopause and Beyond, PCOS, Prism Blog, Transgender Wellness

Plum Blossom for Hair Loss

Plum blossom therapy is a great alternative to prescription finasteride (which can come with unwanted side effects) and toxic creams and over the counter medications.

I love plum blossom therapy, it’s gentle and effective for hair loss (more details). It involves using a tiny hammer with light pressure just until slight redness appears. This stimulates circulation to the scalp which helps to reawaken hair follicles and encourage hair growth. DHT, the compound responsible for hair loss, is only formed in low oxygen environments, so by increasing circulation with plum blossom therapy, the concentration of DHT is reduced. Studies have shown an 80% success rate for androgenic alopecia % and a 97% effectiveness rate for alopecia aureata in all genders.

Plum blossom therapy can be used both for scalp hair loss and also for encouraging facial hair growth. It can even be used for reducing scars, wrinkles, pores, visible blood vessels, and can increase collagen and skin softness (for facial feminization therapy).

In combination with herbal formulas, this technique can create significant hair restoration. Find out more about herbal formulas for hair loss here.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

For more herbal estrogens, ideas, and resources see my previous posts: Feminizing Herbs and “The Basics.”

Acupuncture, Endometriosis, Neuropathy, PCOS, Prism Blog, Surgical Recovery, Transgender Wellness

Opening The Four Gates

One of the most common balancing and stress-relieving treatments is called “The Four Gates” and it’s just four points: two by your thumbs and two by your big toes.  It seems so simple, but it feels powerful! The 4 gates circulate energy throughout your body, improving your circulation, and releasing pain and stress out of the body. It works beautifully alone, or in combination with other points.

Together, these points are a great treatment for pain and stress, especially pain caused or aggravated by stress (think tight shoulders). We use it a lot for preventing menstrual cramps, releasing stress and anxiety, and easing headaches, tight muscles, and stress.

hi-2292499_1920Individually, the points by your thumbs enhance your immune system, reduce inflammation, ease pain, and treat anything to do with the face (headaches, facial pain, TMJ, allergies, colds, toothaches, acne, etc.) They are found at the place where your thumb rests on the opposite hand when you shake hands.

 

leg-1505033_1920The points by your big toes ease pain, calm the nervous system (for anxiety, depression, and other emotional issues), treat menstrual disorders, and assist your liver in detoxification. They are found in the depression between your big toe and second toe.


All information in this blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements, or changing or discontinuing your medications.


Contact us to see if your insurance covers services at our office!

Join the Prism Family! Subscribe to our newsletter and get $30 off your first visit.

For more herbal estrogens, ideas, and resources see my previous posts: Feminizing Herbs and “The Basics.”